Susan Moore - 500 hour certificate

"Sue has been practicing yoga for over 40 years, with many wonderful teachers and different yoga traditions.  She attended one of Jim's retreats (of many!) and realised she had discovered something really special and a feeling of "coming home". Travelled to India on another retreat with Jim she became inspired to start the Vajrasati teacher training programme.
Sue’s teaching incorporates a sense of discovering how meditative breath finds space, joy and happiness, a feeling of unfolding from a bud to a flower, like ‘unfolding butterfly wings’ where her practice changed to a slower pace which actually increased her flexibility and core strength.  A broken shoulder last year gave a new insight to the perspective of healing through letting go, rehabilitation, restorative yoga and Jim's patience on yet another Indian retreat.  Sue has also trained with Judith Lassiter and is now a Relax and Renew Teacher.  She recently completed the advanced course and is hoping to become an advanced Relax and Renew Teacher when she completes her case study.  She has recently began to start teaching chair yoga and has begun training with Keep Active Westminster on a volunteer basis with physiotherapists to help people who have had a stroke or fall to regain their confidence and rehabilitation and sneaking in yoga at the same time.   She regularly takes weekend and day courses with Khadine Morcom, at Gayles and Florence House; Sarah Scharf, Joyce McKiken and senior restorative teacher Adelene Cheong at the Life Centre in Islington. Sue teaches at a community centre in central London in Pimlico and with Open Age for over 55's both at an old people's home and at the St Margaret's Hub." 

Vajrasati newsletter

Stay informed on our latest news!

Syndicate content

Quotes

on asteya (one of the five yamas)…
‘Any selfish act is acting without asteya, it is taking somehow, maybe taking someone else’s choice or freedom or opinion. It is about being aware not just of myself but of others, how do I interact with others (for instance not jumping in during a conversation, which I do too often).
There is an enormous aspect of letting go, especially for me, letting go of a need to control. It is basically trust.’

— Khadine Morcom