Jathara Parivartasana (general level)

 

  1. Lay on your back with your knees bent and your lower back settling naturally downwards
  2. If your head tips back (chin moves away from the chest) or if you feel dizzy or disorientated then a head support can be taken (yoga block or neatly folded blanket)
  3. Stretch your arms out to the sides with your elbows placed slightly higher than your shoulders (the arms rest fully on the floor)
  4. Add a ‘light’ bend at the elbow (no less than 90 degrees between the bicep and the forearm)
  5. Take a few breaths while you let the connective tissue (muscle, flesh, ligament, tendon, and skin) release across the front of the shoulder joints
  6. After having allowed sufficient time for the release , without moving the arms, use your hip flexors to lift your feet of the floor and to draw your legs towards your pelvis(hip flexion)
  7. Feeling the tone within and beneath your abdominals pull your thighs up until your pelvis feels light on the floor and then maintaining that level of flexion lower your legs to the floor to the side of you
  8. Keep ‘looking up’ with your chest and face as your legs descend.
  9. Hover the legs above the floor making sure that your feet don’t descend lower than your knees (if too strong allow the legs to ‘land’)
  10. Stay for 20 -60 seconds drawing the belly in and lifting the chest up to keep length in the back
  11. Breathe into the back (opposite side to where you legs are landing)  shoulder and chest and into the medial (nearest the spine) part of the back shoulder blade to allow a soft spreading sensation across the collar bones
  12. To come up use one inhale to ascend all the way
  13. Place both feet back on the floor with knees bent and with an easy lift- and - tuck draw your buttocks towards your heels and then your shoulder blades towards your buttocks to realign for side two.
  14. Repeat from top for side two

 

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— Hermann Hesse