Vajrasati newsletter

Stay informed on our latest news!

 

We invite you to join The Vajrasati Yoga community - exploring your personal yoga path. 

The axis on which Vajrasati spins is people power.

 

All teachers, trainees and students of Vajrasati Yoga are trusted and encouraged to make their own honest exploration into yoga, it's practice and it's implications.

Just as a mountaineer makes their own journey up a mountain, that journey will be original and demand the highest degree of creativity.

 

Vajrasati Yoga (VS Yoga) most often takes the form of a straightforward Modern Postural Yoga class i.e. body work.

 Interwoven into the fabric of the MPY asanas is the spirit of the yoga movement as it has come down to us through its various influences such as Tantra, Raja, Advaita Vedanta and Buddhism. 

This is done through the tone of the relationship we have with the practice and through the central premise embodied in the word yoga itself; that the isolation of breath, body, mind, heart, energy is simply a convention which covers a more obvious truth that each of these elements are inseparable parts of one whole experience that has at its heart freedom, joy, wisdom, and bliss. 

We encourage non violence (ahimasa), honesty (satya), investigation (svadyaya) as well as using a sense of trust (ishvara pranidhana), or letting go, to find a deeper intuitive connection (yoga) to what we do. 

The classes integrate movement, breath, philosophy and humour in a way that leaves you feeling lighter, refreshed and revitalised.

Vajrasati Yoga was founded by Jim Tarran in 2000 and is a Yoga Alliance 500 RYS  

                                                                                                                                                                                                                              

Quotes

on asteya (one of the five yamas)…
‘Any selfish act is acting without asteya, it is taking somehow, maybe taking someone else’s choice or freedom or opinion. It is about being aware not just of myself but of others, how do I interact with others (for instance not jumping in during a conversation, which I do too often).
There is an enormous aspect of letting go, especially for me, letting go of a need to control. It is basically trust.’

— Khadine Morcom